Sunday, April 24, 2016

Project Update: Yokomo Drift Package Type C RWD

Sorry for the lack of content recently. I've started a new job, and have been working on some other projects that have kept me away from the keyboard lately.

A while back I posted about an upcoming build of the Yokomo Type C chassis. It took a little longer than expected to complete, but it has been a fun project. I'm not going to detail the entire build but will give you the highlights of what I am calling a "budget" RWD build.


The build is pretty straightforward, and I used a limited number of upgrades along the way.





Up front Usukani upper and lower arms in Yokomo blue were used. You will need 2.5mm lowers for the Yokomo chassis. For knuckles I used some MST plastic pieces that I had lying around. For steering a pair of Team Suzuki long wiper arms were used along with some extensions that I 3D printed with carbon fiber filament. The extensions are copies of the ones that come with the D4 RWD if you want to source them. An OMG plastic case servo handles the steering with more than enough capability. I'm also using a Onisiki gyro, that is mounted on a custom mount that I designed and 3d printed in CF. I've been really impressed with this gyro so far, especially considering the price. It is rock solid and smooth.



The combination of front end components works well, gives plenty of lock, and great ackerman adjustment.




Out back, I have kept things pretty simple. Almost all stock components are used. I did pick up an Active Hobby spur gear adapter to install as the stock gearing was not a good fit with 10.5 motor I am using. Gearing is currently a 82 spur gear and a 15 pinion. For power a Speed Passion 10.5 paired with a Reventon R ESC are being used.


I decided to give the stock rear suspension a try on the Type C. I have been intrigued by the potential of some active toe geometry that this setup provides. It should be fun to experiment with the rear toe link geometry to get various levels of active toe. Shocks are stock Type C all around with some M's pistons installed for a little extra smoothness.



The balance of this car works out really nice right out of the box. We have been shooting for about 55% rear weight on our chassis lately, and this one comes in right at that.


This chassis drives really well, and took only a minimal amount of tuning to get it sliding nice. I am looking forward to working with it and seeing how much better I can get it. The plan is to keep it simple and "budget" for a while, retaining the plastic tub chassis even. At some point I may pick up one of the many conversion chassis for it and take it to the next level, but for now, it is working pretty nice as is.




9 comments:

  1. which do you prefer handling wise... this build or the D4?

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    Replies
    1. They both have similar characteristics, but I have them set up similar as well. You won't go wrong with either.

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  2. Did you have to do anything to get the d4 plate copys to fit the suzuki arms? Drilling or anything? I'm in the process of doing a rwd drift package as well.

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    Replies
    1. They mount directly to the Suzuki arms with no modification.

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    2. They mount directly to the Suzuki arms with no modification.

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  3. Cool! can you post a pic of the steering angle you achieved with that setup? From above would be good.

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  4. I also have mst knuckles and usukani arms. What ball studs and ball cups did you use in your arms? Also where can esourceI some shims for the usukani uppers?

    Thanks, D

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  5. Replies
    1. Thank you. I really enjoy driving this one.

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